Up till about a month ago, I was wolfing down my favourites like it was the end of all good food – Ban Mian, Gem biscuits and my personal sweetheart, Rotiboy – A uniquely Asian bread bun with a thick sweet coffee crust that makes your heart melt as much as your mouth.

That is, until I received this diagnosis, effectively making me one of the unhappiest people during meal-times: Celiac Disease, aka. Gluten intolerance.

Note: bae (beɪ/) – a person’s boyfriend or girlfriend (often as a form of address).

Capitalising on the Chinese New Year long weekend holiday and escaping to Taipei probably wasn’t the smartest idea I’ve made. After all, they are a country that celebrates Chinese New Year. As a result, this translated into jam-packed streets and suffocating train rides. Genius, Tish.

Disclaimer: Long, face-palming Taipei recount up ahead. Proceed at own risk time.

Public gyms in Taipei are beautiful. Aesthetically, they’re knock-out champions – most unlike the dull multi-mirrored vain-pods you so often find in Singapore. Wallpapered and themed, these Taipei gyms are made to look like an urban-looking backstreet alleyway, and others designed to look like a modern spaceship, the gym’s sleek machinery complimenting it’s cool grey interiors.

This story is hard to begin, probably because this has only happened to me one other time in my life. I was 17 and having sushi alone in a seedy cube of a ‘restaurant’ wedged between a hairdresser and a neighbourhood gynaecologist.

Back then, I had only been just introduced to her for a brief 10 minutes before texting her half my life’s tragedy and the horrors that were my relationship. I don’t know what kind of reply I expected, but it wasn’t an “Okay, that’s cool. You’re cool.”

Nat’s been my best friend for (nearly) the past decade.